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Fifty Shades of Green? Political differences between elites, members and supporters of Europe Ecologie Les Verts

Abstract : In recent years, many political parties have created new forms of affiliation and have justified the blurring of membership boundaries with claims that sympathisers would be more representative of the electorate and less radical. Such claims are based on ‘popular wisdom’ inspired by John May’s ‘special law of curvilinearity’, which states that activists hold more extreme views than voters and elites. When this expectation has been tested, results have been at best inconclusive; but testing has so far never used a single survey to compare different groups. Using an online survey of Europe Ecologie Les Verts party members and their extended networks (affiliated supporters, lapsed members, sympathisers), relationships between ideological differences and degree of investment in party activities and decision-making are analysed. The results, contradicting May’s special law along all ideological dimensions other than intra-party democracy, can be explained if May’s narrowly instrumental assumptions about preference formation are rejected.
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https://hal-sciencespo.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02184173
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Submitted on : Monday, July 15, 2019 - 6:06:38 PM
Last modification on : Friday, July 2, 2021 - 1:59:53 PM

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Daniel Boy, Florence Faucher. Fifty Shades of Green? Political differences between elites, members and supporters of Europe Ecologie Les Verts. Environmental Politics, 2017, pp.161 - 185. ⟨hal-02184173⟩

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